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Webinar: Adoption of Clean Energy Technologies: Empirical Evidence

  
The adoption of clean technologies is not straightforward despite their numerous benefits. Several factors influence it. This webinar aims to enlighten those factors by presenting empirical studies on the adoption of electric vehicles in China and renewable energy technologies in US Midwest. It also presents a review of empirical literature that examines the adoption of clean cooking in developing countries.

Moderator:

Govinda Timilsina, Sr. Economist, Research Department, World Bank, Washington, DC

Presentations & Speakers:

The Role of Government in the Market for Electric Vehicles: Evidence from China
Shanjun Li, Professor, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University -- Speaker
Xianglei Zhu, Chief Data Scientist, China Automotive Technology and Research Center, Beijing, China
Yiding Ma, PhD student, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, Cornell University
Fan Zhang, Senior Economist, Chief Economist's Office, Infrastructure Vice Presidency, World Bank, Washington, DC

Shanjun Li is a Professor of Applied Economics and Policy and holds Kenneth L. Robinson Chair in the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University. He serves as the co-director of Cornell Institute for China Economic Research (CICER). He is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and a university fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF). His research areas include environmental and energy economics, urban and transportation economics, empirical industrial organization, and Chinese economy.


Understandings of the Competition in the Electricity Market and its implications to the Adoption of Renewables: Evidence from the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative
Gal Hochman, Professor, Department of Agriculture, Food, & Resource Economics, Rutgers University, New Jersey -- Speaker
Ze Song. Ph. D Student, Department of Agriculture, Food, & Resource Economics, Rutgers University, New Jersey

Gal Hochman received his Ph.D. in Economics at Columbia University in 2004. His work focuses on biotechnology, energy, the environment, and on trade agreements. Gal’s work assessed the economic implications from allocating polluting rights to fossil extracting and fossil consuming countries. Gal has attended and presented papers at numerous conferences, including the ASSA, the ACS, the CEA, the Econometric Society, the EEA, and the IAEE.


Adoption of Clean Cooking: A Review of Empirical Evidence
Govinda Timilsina, Sr. Economist, Research Department, World Bank, Washington, DC -- Speaker
Sunil Malla, Independent Researcher, Dallas, Texas

Dr. Timilsina is a Senior Research Economist at the Development Research Group of the World Bank, Washington, DC. He has more than 22 years’ experience across a board range of energy and climate change economics and policies at the international level. His key expertise includes electricity economics and planning, general equilibrium and energy sector modeling, biofuels, energy efficiency, clean and renewable energy economics and policies and carbon pricing. Prior to joining the Bank, Dr. Timilsina was a Senior Research Director at the Canadian Energy Research Institute, Calgary, Canada. At present, he is leading a number of studies including climate change policies, regional electricity trade, economics of renewable energy and infrastructure and economic growth.