37th IAEE International Conference Session Descriptions

SUNDAY, JULY 28

Special PHD Session

1:00pm - 5:15pm • Herald Square Suite

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MONDAY, JULY 29

Opening Plenary Session: International Implications of U.S. Energy Renaissance

9:30am - 10:30am • New Yorker Hotel Grand Ballroom

Surging production of oil and gas in the U.S. is having effects on energy markets around the world, helping consumers and providing stiffer competition for producers. However, this growth also is raising questions about public acceptance of energy development activities and stimulating a debate over U.S. energy exports. There are indirect effects within the U.S. as well, among them assisting energy intensive industries to expand output and gain market share. In this session, such effects will be discussed in detail. The leadoff talk will offer a U.S. viewpoint while discussants will comment from European and Middle Eastern perspectives and develop broader implications, both for the short and the long run. These will include reproducibility on a global scale, strategic and competitive implications, logistic and infrastructure challenges, and implications for world economic activity and growth.

Concurrent Sessions 1 - 10

11:00am - 12:45pm

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Lunch and Poster Session

12:45pm - 2:00pm • Manhattan Center Grand Ballroom

These are not just stand-up buffet lunches - they are also great opportunities for all conference delegates to mingle with - and learn from - students who will be presenting posters of their recent academic work in the room where lunch will be available. At this unique event you will be able to network with students and colleagues around energy topics in which you share a common interest. There will be two sets of posters, one on Monday and another on Tuesday. So don’t wait in a long line for food and drink, be first to engage with the students and their posters during these 1¼ hour long breaks from the main conference.

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Dual Plenary Session: Energy & The Economy

2:00pm - 3:30pm • New Yorker Hotel Grand Ballroom

The panel will discuss energy prices and US economic activity. The panel will address whether increased US oil and gas production from shale has impacted energy security, the trade balance and the effects of oil price shocks on the economy.

Dual Plenary Session: Renewables, Power Prices, and Grid Integration

2:00pm - 3:30pm • Crystal Ballroom

The panel will address key issues associated with increasing amounts of renewables on the critical decisions and impacts for grid operators, utilities and other key stakeholders. The panel will present a breadth of perspectives, and address technical, regulatory, economic, and “business model” implications for the power sector, for different structures from different countries & states.

Concurrent Sessions 11-20

4:00pm - 5:45pm

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TUESDAY, JULY 30

Dual Plenary Session: International Shale Development: Prospects and Challenges

9:00am - 10:30am • New Yorker Hotel Grand Ballroom

Top energy economists and environmental specialists will speak to the broad array of challenges facing shale oil and gas development globally, including industry structure, price stability and market mechanisms, as well as physical and environmental concerns over water resources, groundwater and methane leakage. The panel will assume a collaborative, forward-looking posture in focusing on solutions that work, timing, and obstacles that must be faced and resolved.

Dual Plenary Session: Transportation Developments

9:00am - 10:30am • Crystal Ballroom

High global oil prices have encouraged innovation and conservation in many key use sectors, and environmental drivers are also driving rapid acceptance of new technologies. This trend is now gaining momentum globally in the transportation sector where local and federal government policies are accelerating the pace of penetration of new more efficient vehicles and adoption of alternative fuels. The purpose of this session is to discuss both policy and commercial drivers to these challengers to incumbent fuels and vehicle designs and their ultimate impact on the future of the transportation sector fuel mix.

Concurrent Sessions 21-30

11:00am - 12:45pm

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Lunch and Poster Session

12:45pm - 2:00pm • Manhattan Center Grand Ballroom

These are not just stand-up buffet lunches—they are also great opportunities for all conference delegates to mingle with – and learn from - students who will be presenting posters of their recent academic work in the room where lunch will be available. At this unique event you will be able to network with students and colleagues around energy topics in which you share a common interest. There will be two sets of posters, one on Monday and another on Tuesday. So don’t wait in a long line for food and drink, be first to engage with the students and their posters during these 1¼ hour long breaks from the main conference.

Click here to view poster sessions

Dual Plenary Session: Oil & Gas Reserve Valuation & Financing

2:00pm - 3:30pm • New Yorker Hotel Grand Ballroom

This session will focus on resource assessment techniques, the process of a firm’s reserve estimation, and the manner in which these issues affect how firms value acreage and ultimately translate their assessments into production. The session will also address the role of uncertainty in estimating resources and reserves and how such uncertainty translates into production outlooks and expected profitability.

Dual Plenary Session: Climate Change and Carbon Policies - International Lessons and Perspectives

2:00pm - 3:30pm • Crystal Ballroom

Climate change and carbon policies continue to shape regional and national policies, but approaches vary widely. The objective of this plenary session is to highlight different approaches to climate and carbon policies in the U.S., Asia, and Europe, and to compare results obtained, and perspectives of these policies going forward. What role does “issue linking” play, e.g. using climate policy as a lever for increased taxation to solve fiscal problems, or to develop sustainable infrastructure. The discussion will also include international coordination of policies, as seen from the perspectives of the major actors, and the issue if regional climate agreements can be a step towards global agreement.

Concurrent Sessions 31-40

4:00pm - 5:45pm

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 31

Dual Plenary Session: Energy Financing

9:00am - 10:30am • New Yorker Hotel Grand Ballroom

The future development of global energy resources requires both the presence of economically producible material and the activity to convert the resources into first extractable reserves and then actual production. For the necessary activity to occur -- besides access to the resource – there must be investment. While the issue of resources and reserves has been widely addressed, the path of future activity has gotten less attention. The purpose of this session is to look at the interesting history of how energy activity has traditionally been financed and what the prospects are for future innovation to confront the changing geography and composition of global energy markets; what is currently working and what is not and what the main challenges are moving forward.

Dual Plenary Session: Utility Business Model

9:00am - 10:30am • Crystal Ballroom

This session will address profound challenges to its traditional business model faced by the electric utility sector worldwide. Utilities must redefine their business, driven by the proliferation of efficient but potentially disruptive digital technologies; by customers’ new options including distributed self-generation, time-of-use price responsiveness, and electricity storage; by entrepreneurial third parties seeking to serve those customers directly; by environmental mandates including decarbonization of generation; and by the need to maintain or improve power quality, reliability and resiliency in the face of increasing potential for outages caused by weather or cyber-intrusions. All of these factors imply major investments, none imply major increases in the sales of electricity on which utilities have traditionally based their revenue requirements, and some imply potential for deregulation or competition where monopoly service is now assumed. This panel of experts will suggest how electric utilities world-wide are planning or hoping to survive or even thrive in the very different electric sector business environment of coming years, and how energy economists can bring their particular skills and expertise to bear in this challenging transition.

Concurrent Sessions 41-49

11:00am - 12:45pm

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Concurrent Sessions 50-57

2:00pm - 3:45pm

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Closing Plenary Session: Global Energy Demand Growth and Student Poster Session Award

4:15pm - 5:45pm • New Yorker Hotel Grand Ballroom

Since 2000 global energy demand has grown by more than 30%. Non-OECD economies have displaced OECD economies as the key drivers of global energy demand, but on average non-OECD economies exhibit per-capita energy consumption that is still only a quarter that of OECD economies. What does this say about the amount of energy needed in 20, 30 or 50 years? How will we supply those energy needs? What role will fossil fuels, renewables and nuclear power play? How will environmental constraints factor in? To what extent will local, regional and national energy markets integrate with one another? The closing plenary session of the 2014 NYC conference will feature leading world energy experts who will give their views on what to expect and when to expect it.